Nora Veterinary Hospital

1308 E 91st St
Indianapolis, IN 46240

(317)846-7334

www.noravethospital.com

Nora Veterinary Hospital welcomes you!

Nora Veterinary Hospital has been a part of the Nora Community for over 30 years.  We are a full service small animal clinic offering vaccinations, spays, neuters, dentals etc.  We also have a full boarding kennel and grooming services for cats and dogs.  We are located on 91st Street between College Avenue and Westfield Boulevard.

Please call us at 317-846-7334 or email us at noravethospital@gmail.com with any questions that you may have.

We look forward to serving you and your pets!

Announcements:

Hospital Policies:
Although we work almost exclusively by appointment, occasionally we do get "walk-ins". We do try to accommodate these, but they can be disruptive to clients who have already scheduled appointments. We have therefore decided to institute a "walk-in" surcharge of $25 in addition to any appointment charges. If your pet needs to be seen and you are unable to call ahead to set an appointment, this charge will apply and we will work you in as we are able and as the illness of the pet dictates. 

We are no longer allowing retractable leashes in the building. If you have a regular leash for your dog, we ask that you please bring them to their appointment on that leash. If you do not have a regular leash, we do have a "leash exchange" set up so that you can swap out your retractable leash while you are here. This is for the safety of you, your pet, other clients and their pets, and the hospital staff.

Boarding Policies:
We require that all dogs be current on Rabies, Distemper, Bordetella (kennel cough), and canine influenza vaccines to stay in our boarding kennel. Any dog that has yet to be vaccinated for the influenza vaccine must start the vaccine series at least 2 weeks prior to their stay with us (exceptions will be made for true emergency situations). When first starting the flu series, you need to have 2 vaccines done two to four weeks apart, and then follow up with a yearly vaccine. For compliance with  manufacturer guarantees, any dog that is more than 6 months overdue for their yearly flu vaccine must start the series over. We understand that this can be frustrating for some pet owners, so we recommend that you include the vaccine as part of your yearly routine. 

Grooming clients:  
Please consider the following when scheduling grooming appointments:
1) Please schedule all appointments in advance. If you groom regularly, getting on the schedule sooner than later will help ensure you have a spot. Please feel free to schedule as far in advance as you'd like. 
2) Please plan to schedule your appointments at least 2 weeks *or more* in advance
3) Please be patient. We understand that it can be very frustrating when we don't have any appointments available. As stated earlier, we are doing our best to get people on the schedule as soon as possible, working in where we can.

If you are running late for your appointment: Please contact the office prior to your scheduled appointment time to let us know that you may be late. Any appointments arriving 15 minutes or later past their scheduled time, may need to reschedule their appointment. If the appointment is not rescheduled, and we have not been notified, then a late fee may be applied to the total charges of the visit. 

Please browse our website to learn more about our animal clinic and the veterinary services we provide for companion animals in Indianapolis and the surrounding areas. Read information in our Pet Library, view instructional videos, and find details about special offers. Please call our office today at (317)846-7334 for all your pet health care needs or click here to contact us or to set up an appointment.

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